Tiny Saga #4: Framing & Insulation

When we tore out the garage door, we also demolished the second-floor subflooring. We also added 2’x2′ around the studs to make them 6′ in depth (it used to be 2’x4’s on the roof) on the roof to comply with the city inspection code on insulation later on.

We rented a local dumpster service for the demolition of the subflooring and the garage door. These guys are so professional and extended extra days because my handyman was running a little late. *Pro-tip: always negotiate (and do it nicely). Our local dumpster service guy was very friendly and told us if we rented it for a Friday pick-up, he will most likely not have time to pick it up, and leave the dumpster for the weekend and pick it up Monday. This allowed us extra days to throw all the construction trash on the weekend. Conversely, the dumpster companies are usually less busy mid-week, so negotiating Tuesday – Tuesday (8 days) rental would be a lot easier than a Friday – Monday (4 days), and sometimes they’ll even be cheaper!

The sub-floor of the loft consists of 2x8s based on the size of the loft in the building code for our area (see below). 

Because the wall studs were 20 inches apart (instead of the 16 inches for dwellings), we had to add one new stud in between each old stud in order to pass inspection. This made the space between each stud 10 inches and inevitably made insulation a lot harder. Each insulation strip we bought (store-bought is usually 16 inches) needed to be cut to 9-10 inches wide and installed. For future reference, I would have insisted on making a stud at the 16-inch mark because it would make insulation a lot faster.

The biggest hurdle we found was trying to find someone to spray open-cell insulation foam on the roof. It is hard to find anyone who wants to come and spray the foam because it is a very small area. We had one guy who bailed out on us after 5+ weeks of waiting. Eventually, we found a guy recommended by our realtor who came the next day and sprayed in the foam. It is important to note that when you ask for spray foam, make sure to ask if they are going to use their own generator because the guy who came and sprayed ours asked if he could plug into an outlet. But because he needed a 220v and we don’t have an outlet with the same voltage, he decided to just hook the spraying machine up to his generator. Had we allowed him to use the electricity in the house, we may be paying a lot more in our electric bill that month. It’s not a deal-breaker, but it would be a negotiating point for pricing at that point.

It took another two weeks for us to put in the wall insulation. We had to wear full-body suits, gloves, and masks to ensure the fiberglass doesn’t get on our skin. It is now so hot and humid in the summer of NW Arkansas, we had to take frequent breaks as we put in the insulation. Towards the end, Mr. Codejunkie and I found our rhythm: I would cut the insulation batting while he installs them and measures the next cavity length and width.

It was definitely a celebratory moment when the city inspector came in and gave us the green light for the completion of the inspection. It took the inspector a total of 2 seconds and he gave us the green slip right away!

A couple of lessons I learned was: 

  1. Always ask the inspector for ideas at the beginning of your project. 

I asked the inspector about insulation when I presented the project to him. He’s the one who told me about adding 2’x2′ on the roof studs and spray foam insulation. Had I not know that I would have found out the hard way and thinking the insulation cannot be done because prior to this, I didn’t know there was a difference between spray foam, batting, and blown-in insulation!

2. Waiting for 2 weeks is the maximum I will do for subcontractors.

Of course, this is just a general rule for dealing with new subcontractors instead of the ones I have worked with many times before. But I will not wait for a subcontractor for more than two weeks.

I would have never let this slip if I were running this construction as a business, so I should reconsider using this subcontractor after he has stood me up twice (he ended up standing me up 5+ times).

This subcontractor was recommended by my trusted electricians. He also installed the A/C and heating unit in my house. He runs a small business of insulation so he gave me a very cheap price on open-cell spray foam. He also talked about insulation and energy efficiency passionately. The only drawback my electricians warned me was that this guy is hard to get a hold of, and I just had to keep calling him. So I did. For many weeks, I called him every week around Monday, and he often told me that he’s sorry he’s busy that day, but he has it on his schedule to come out later in the week to spray the roof and ask me to call him back later in the week to remind him. I would follow up with him later in the week and he’d say, “I have another job lined up that I want to spray both yours and the other house together since you have small square footage. This way I don’t have to set up the spraying machine twice.” It made sense, so I thought I could just call back again. Usually, the project gets delayed because his other project gets canceled. I thought if I were diligent and friendly, eventually, I could get him to spray the insulation. It struck me that he had no respect for me when I called after 5+ weeks of waiting and following-up weekly, he picked up the phone and said: “are you doing your weekly call and begging me to do work for you again?”

Since then, I found another insulation contractor to spray the foam onto the ceiling and I’ve decided to put a time limit on how long I would wait for a contractor to show up for the job.

For my other tiny house articles, check out this page that contains them all.

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